Agenda

Monday, May 7 – Pre-conference Workshops & Activities

REGISTRATION OPEN

Noon–5 p.m.

Registration Open

WORKSHOPS

2–5 p.m.

Basics of In-Lieu Fee Mitigation for Species and Wetlands 101 Workshop

Includes access to online audio and materials. Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $100

FACILITATORS:  Jessica Wilkinson, Senior Policy Advisor, Mitigation, The Nature Conservancy, Arlington, VA; Sara Mascola, Program Advisor, The Nature Conservancy, Denver, CO; Rebecca Kihslinger, Science and Policy Analyst and Director of the Wetlands Program, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, DC

Facilitated by The Nature Conservancy and The Environmental Law Institute, the purpose of the workshop is to provide an overview of the basics of the in-lieu fee program approval process and expectations for program design and operation. Experienced in-lieu fee practitioners should attend the workshop titled “In-Lieu Fee Mitigation for Species and Wetlands — Advanced Topics” on Tuesday.

Tuesday, May 8 – Pre-conference Workshops & Outdoor Classrooms

OUTDOOR CLASSROOMS

8 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

Outdoor Classroom #1: Rolling Fork Stream and Wetland Mitigation Bank

Hosted by Ecosystem Investment Partners • Beaver Creek Hydrology • Stream Restoration Specialists
(1 hour 45 minutes each way); Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $75

The Rolling Fork Stream and Wetland Mitigation Bank is one of the largest private mitigation banks in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Situated on a 2,730-acre site in Marion and Casey Counties, this bank provides downstream water quality improvements for the limestone-underlain Bluegrass region of central Kentucky, home of the many of the state’s famous thoroughbred horse farms and bourbon distilleries. The bank was first approved in 2015 by the Interagency Review Team, and construction was completed in 2016 for one headwater watershed on the site. Three other headwater watersheds are permitted and ready for construction. In total, Ecosystem Investment Partners, together with Beaver Creek Hydrology and Stream Restoration Specialists, will re-establish and rehabilitate over 237,000 linear feet (45 miles) of stream habitat at this bank. 64,000 linear feet (12 miles) of streams have been constructed up to this point. Over 400,000 live stakes and bareroot seedlings are included in the planting plan. This site visit will contrast typical degraded aquatic resources in the region due to agriculture and logging—two of the largest sources of sediment pollution to waterways in Kentucky and historic disturbances on this bank site—to the improved aquatic resources of a fully restored watershed highlighting geomorphologic stability, aquatic habitat, and riparian vegetation. Transportation will be provided to the site, and on-site access will require hiking. Please bring appropriate footwear. The site visit will not include active construction areas; as such, PPE will not be required. Lunch will be served on site.

Ecosystem Investment Partners Beaver Creek Hydrology Stream Restoration Specialists

8 a.m.–12 p.m.

Outdoor Classroom #2: Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest

Hosted by Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest
(45 minute drive each way); Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $75

The 15,625 acre Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest comprises the largest privately-owned conservation and education property in Kentucky. Our diverse landscapes provide for a multitude of plants and animals, existing across habitats of mature forest, prairies, glades, caves, and streams. The Imperiled Bat Conservation Fund has helped Bernheim acquire tracts (over 1000 acres total) to help buffer their Foundation-owned forest, and has both Indiana bat and NLEB maternity colonies, and have installed Branden bark roost structures in a couple locations that are being used. Participants will also see a stream mitigation site. With a mission of connecting people with nature, and a focus on managing for biodiversity and resiliency in the landscape, Bernheim plays a unique role as a conservation leader in the Louisville region. [also available Friday, May 11, 12:30–4 p.m.]
Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest

8 a.m.–4 p.m.

Outdoor Classroom #3: Daniel Boone National Forest

Hosted by Boone Forest National Park and University of Louisville Stream Institute
(2.5 hour each way); Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $75

The collaborative effort between the University of Louisville Stream Institute, the Daniel Boone National Forest, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, and Advanced Enterprises 5.4 miles of stream have currently been restored. An additional 3.5 miles will be restored in the next couple of years. Participants will learn about lessons learned on stream and wetland restoration on public lands associated with these partnerships, and will experience what stream channels in the eastern U.S. may have looked like prior to European settlement. They will learn innovative restoration techniques to return degraded channels to a stream/wetland complex.

The Slabcamp Creek and Stonecoal Branch watersheds have been logged and cultivated in the past, and the alluvial fans of major tributaries were sites for homesteads that were abandoned in the early twentieth century. The majority of both watersheds are now within the Daniel Boone National Forest, but the streams are still showing the effects of channel straightening and down-cutting. These streams contained few pools, and the remnant pools were narrow and shallow. Stream riffles were uncommon, and the riffles present were often imbedded with fine-grained sediment, which provides poor habitat for aquatic life. The soils along the steep eroding banks clouded the water with silt and clay sediment after heavy rains. The movement of aquatic organisms was restricted, particularly at road crossings. The restoration project is returning stream channels, bottomland hardwood forest, and wet-meadow wetlands to their natural condition.

WORKSHOPS

8 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Basics of Banking 101 Workshop

Includes access to online audio and materials. Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $145

FACILITATORS:  Robert W. Brumbaugh, Senior Policy Analyst, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.; Hall Holland, Assistant Region Manager and John Wigginton, Southeast Region Manager, Westervelt Ecological Services, Sacramento, Calif.; and Craig Denisoff, President, Craig Denisoff Consulting, Davis, Calif.

Ideal for those new to or exploring an interest in mitigation or conservation banking.

How-to’s of both Mitigation and Conservation Banking are presented in this half-day workshop. Starting with the history of banking, this workshop addresses site selection and technical aspects, monitoring and the business of banking (legal, financial, marketing) including walking participant through a banking agreement.

9–11:30 a.m.

In Lieu of Fee Programs for Wetlands and Species 102 – ADVANCED Workshop

Includes access to online audio and materials.  Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $100

FACILITATORS: Jessica Wilkinson, Senior Policy Advisor-Mitigation, Rebecca Kihslinger, Science and Policy Analyst, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C., and Sara Mascola, Program Advisor, Development by Design, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, D.C.

Facilitated by The Nature Conservancy and The Environmental Law Institute, the purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for current in-lieu fee practitioners to share expertise and best practices, thereby supporting the delivery of in-lieu fee programs that support high and consistent standards for compensatory mitigation. The workshop will cover a range of issues including, for example, the project approval process, long-term financing, and fee schedules. It is designed for an audience knowledgeable about in-lieu fee program operation. Those interested in learning the basics of ILF program design and operation should attend the workshop titled “In-Lieu Fee Mitigation for Species and Wetlands–101” Monday afternoon.

1–2:30 p.m.

Landowners & Environmental Markets – Are There Opportunities for Your Land?

Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $50 MODERATOR: Tim Degraff, Chief Executive Officer, WRA, Inc., San Rafael, Calif.

A workshop style panel discussion for the landowner who wants to understand how their land may fit with opportunities in the mitigation/conservation banking and environmental markets industry. This panel will walk them through the potential opportunities, identifying certain criteria and considerations of land that may fit within the opportunities. This will also prepare landowners for productive engagement with bankers and consultants at the conference.

PANELISTS:
Douglas P. Wheeler, Partner, Hogan Lovells, Washington, D.C.
Jeffrey Kauttu, Principal Appraiser, Kauttu Valuation, St. Augustine, Fla.
George Howard, Co-Founder/CEO, Restoration Systems, Raleigh, N.C.

1–2:30 p.m.

Regulatory In lieu fee & Bank Information Tracking System Workshop

Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $50

FACILITATORS:  Beattie Starr Williams, Director, Computer Sciences & Consulting Services, Applied Research Associates, Vicksburg, Miss.; Shannon Langford, Senior Software Engineer, Applied Research Associates, Inc., Huntsville, Ala.; and Steve Martin, Environmental Scientist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.

A web-based application developed by the Corps with support from EPA and US FWS, Regulatory In lieu fee & Bank Information Tracking System (RIBITS) is being utilized by the Corps and FWS to provide information on mitigation and conservation banking activities. RIBITS provides a range of information on mitigation and conservation banking including bank locations, service areas, credit type and availability, ledgers, and supporting documentation.

The first part of the workshop includes navigation in RIBITS including entering and editing data in RIBITS, entering credit transactions in bank ledgers, loading documents and images, creation of bank limits and service areas, and editing bank data.

The second part focuses on data mining — user-generated queries data, export of data, and geographic searches. It focuses on entering and editing data in RIBITS, including entering credit transactions in bank ledgers, loading documents and images, creation of bank limits and service areas, and editing bank data.

1–2:30 p.m.

Sales and Marketing Workshop & Roundtables

Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $50

FACILITATORS: Sheri F. Lewin, President and Kae Hovater, Director of Research and Analysis, Environmental Resource Marketing, Clermont, Fla.; Troy Madrigal, Vice President and Chelsea Nikmard, Mitigation Sales Manager, MSUSA, Houston, Tex.; and Travis Hemmen, Vice President, Westervelt Ecological Services, Sacramento, Calif.

The roundtable workshop begins with an overview of topics, and then will breakout into 5 different roundtable topics related to sales and marketing of credits. Participants will rotate to three of the five topics during the workshop, spending approximately 20 minutes on each topic where each table’s presenter will provide a short presentation on the topic followed by open discussion and Q&A to groups of 12-15 around the table. Roundtable Topics include: Client Relations and Education (teaching tools and a discussion on the importance of educating clients through the complex process of mitigation banking); The Power of Networking (Strategy, Execution and Technique and the importance of positive business relationships); Price Quotes (as an industry we are challenged by the perception of prices); Permitting Support-When and How To Help Potential Clients (sales are made when permits are issued; the discussion will focus on how to manage this process); and Evaluating Key Demand Drivers- Successful Sales efforts begin in the Due Diligence Phase (learn about finding and evaluating future trends and opportunities).

2:45–4:15 p.m.

ADVANCED Conservation Banking Workshop

Includes online access to audio and materials. Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $75

FACILITATORS:   Shauna Ginger, Ecosystem Services Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, Ore.; Shauna Marquardt, Fish & Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Columbia Mo.; and Valerie Layne, Senior Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento, Calif.

An advanced course on conservation banking. (more details coming in January).

2:45–4:15 p.m.

ADVANCED Stream Banking Workshop

Includes online access to audio and materials. Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $75

FACILITATORS:   Steve Jones, President, Meanders River Restoration, Ellijay, Ga. and Jennifer Walker, Chief of Evaluation Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth, Tex.

An advanced course on stream banking and restoration practices involved facilitated by banker and stream restoration experts with a local regulatory perspective, this course provides current and new information in stream banking including practices, experiences and regulatory changes affecting stream banking today.

4:30–5:45 p.m.

Risks and Rewards of Bank vs. ILF vs. PRM (for customer/user, regulator & mitigation provider)

Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $75 ((Included with Federal, State & Local Government registration)

[Detailed description coming soon]

4:30–5:45 p.m.

Business of Banking How-to [tbd]

Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $75

[Detailed description coming soon]

4:30–5:45 p.m.

Business of Banking How-to [tbd]

Early Fee (by 1/20/18): $75

[Detailed description coming soon]

BANK TANK®

3–5:30 p.m.

Bank Tank Scheduled Appointments

Bank Tank® Meetings (must apply online)

Wednesday, May 9 – Day One Conference Sessions

FORUMS

7:30–8:45 a.m.

Corps IRT Meeting

8–8:45 a.m.

National Environmental Banking Association Meeting

The National Environmental Banking Association will hold its 2nd annual meeting. NEBA members are encouraged to attend, and non-members are welcome to come and learn about NEBA. Become a Regular Member before NMEBC and save $200 on your registration.

9–10:15 a.m.

Regulators Forum (for regulators on IRTs)

FACILITATORS:   Palmer Hough, Environmental Scientist, Wetlands Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.; Susan-Marie Stedman, Wetland Scientist and Policy Analyst, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Silver Spring, Md.; Steve Martin, Environmental Planner, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.; and Shauna Ginger, Ecosystem Services Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, Ore.

This forum is a venue for federal and state regulators involved in regulating mitigation and conservation banking (those on IRTs) to discuss joint issues and concerns.

9–10:15 a.m.

Customer / User Forum

FACILITATORS:  Michael Ruth, Ecologist/Registered Professional Geologist, Project Development & Environmental Review, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C.;  Owen McDonough, Environmental Policy Manager, National Association of Home Builders, Washington, D.C.; and Corrie Veenstra, Environmental Planner, Project Management Section, U.S. Marine Corps, Camp Pendleton, Calif.

An open exchange of ideas, current hot topics, questions and concerns with those involved in the use of mitigation and conservation banks and other ecosystem programs throughout the United States.

BUSINESS INSTRUCTIONALS (New! Instructionals replace Banker Forum)

INSTRUCTIONALS

9–10:15 a.m.

Benefits to Mitigation Bankers of Becoming a B Corp or Benefit Corp

Stuart Haney, Attorney and Counsel, Leesburg, Va.

[Detailed description coming soon]

9–9:30 a.m.

Meet Mitigation Analyst Lite

FACILITATOR: Michael Sprague, President, Trout Headwaters, Inc., Livingston, Mont.

[Detailed description coming soon]

9–9:30 a.m.

Financial Assurance Mechanisms: Short-Term Assurances

FACILITATOR: Robert Spoth, President at Ecosystems Insurance Associates, LLC, Washington D.C.

9:45–10:15 a.m.

Financial Assurance Mechanisms: The Expected Efficacy and Total Carrying Cost of Various Mechanisms

FACILITATOR: David Dybdahl, CPCU, MBA, President, American Risk Management Resources Network, LLC, Middleton, Wisc.

9:45–11 a.m.

Developing a How-To Guide for Building Biodiversity and Habitat Quantification Tools

FACILITATORS: Scott J. Chiavacci, Ecologist and Emily Pindilli, Economist, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Va.

Discussion will continue through 11 a.m. [Detail description coming soon]

TOOL DEMOS AND DISCUSSIONS

DEMOS/DISCUSSIONS

10:30–11 a.m.

Creating Landscape-scale Durability for All Species Using One Tool

FACILITATOR: Doug Bruggeman, Founder, Ecological Services and Markets, Inc., Marshall, N.C.

[Detailed description coming soon]

10:30–11 a.m.

(continued from 9:45 a.m.) Developing a How-To Guide for Building Biodiversity and Habitat Quantification Tools

FACILITATORS: Scott J. Chiavacci, Ecologist and Emily Pindilli, Economist, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Va.

[Detailed description coming soon]

11–11:30 a.m.

Delivery of LiDAR with Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) in Support of Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking

FACILITATOR: Andy Carroll, Chief Technology Officer, Skytec LLC, Chattanooga, Tenn.

[Detailed description coming soon]

11–11:30 a.m.

Nutrient Tracking Tool (NTT) – a Tool for Evaluation of water Quality and Quantity as Affected by Management Practices
[Detailed description coming soon]

LUNCH BREAK

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Lunch Break on Your Own

PLENARY

1–2 p.m.

Opening Session

CONCURRENTS

2:15–3:45 p.m.

SESSION 1: Status and Trends

MODERATOR David Urban, Managing Director, Ecosystem Investment Partners, Baltimore, Md.

Overview of Single-user vs. Commercial, followed by Urban Mitigation Bank and ILF Projects. Steve Martin, Institute for Water Resources, Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.

A Review of Ecological Performance Standards at Post-2008 Rule Mitigation Banks. Rachel Harrington, ORISE Research Participant, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

Mainstreaming Mitigation: What’s Next for Markets? Genevieve Bennett, Senior Associate, Forest Trends’ Ecosystem Marketplace, Washington, D.C.

SESSION 2: Estuarine Banking & Mitigation

MODERATOR: Susan-Marie Stedman, Wetland Scientist and Policy Analyst, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Silver Spring, Md.

Unique Issues for Marine Mitigation Banks. Eric T. Olsen, Attorney, Hopping Green & Sams, PA, Tallahassee, Fla.

Banking in Coastal Areas on West Coast. Bryant Chesney, Program Manager, NOAA Fisheries, Long Beach, Calif.

SESSION 3: Quantification & Credit Tools

MODERATOR: Christopher Hartley, Deputy Director and Senior Environmental Markets Analyst, USDA, Washington, D.C.

Application of the Hydric Soils Technical Standard as Performance Criteria for Mitigation Banking. Steven Currie, Soil Scientist, CPSS/LPSC, Mitigation Banking Team, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District, Jacksonville, Fla.

Development of a Publicly-available Database of Biodiversity and Habitat Quantification Tools. Scott J. Chiavacci, Ecologist, United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA and Emily Pindilli, Economist, United States Geological Survey, Reston, Va.

The Enviro Atlas. Anne Neale, EnviroAtlas Project Lead, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

PLENARY

4–5:30 p.m.

PLENARY: The Role of States in Banking

MODERATOR: Royal Gardner, Director of the Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy, Stetson University College of Law, Gulfport, FL

Clean Water Act Jurisdiction & State Capacity to Carry out Dredge and Fill Permitting Programs Requiring Mitigation. Jeanne Christie, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers, Windham, ME

Looking to the States – Where Are Non-Federal Drivers of Mitigation? Greg DeYoung, Vice President, Westervelt Ecological Services, Sacramento, CA

Examples of Current State Activities. Donna Collier, Managing Partner, Valencia Wetlands Trust, Priest River, ID

RECEPTION

5:30–7 p.m.

WELCOME RECEPTION in Exhibit Area Hosted by:

National Environmental Banking Association JT&A, inc.

Thursday, May 10 – Day Two Conference Sessions

BREAKFAST

7:45–8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

DISCUSSIONS

7:30–8:15 a.m.

EARLY MORNING SESSIONS

Grab a light breakfast and join these scheduled discussions on important topics.

1982 – The First Mitigation Bank. Mike Zagata, Ph.D., Conservationist and Author, Formerly with Tenneco, Ruffed Groused Society, and others

Postage Stamp Mitigation in the Long-Term: Raining or Shining? Ann Redmond, Managing Scientist, Brown & Caldwell, Maitland Fla.

Difficulties Developing Mitigation or Conservation Banks in an Island Geography. Darren LeBlanc, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Honolulu Hawaii

CONCURRENTS

8:30–10 a.m.

SESSION 4: 10 Years of the Rule

MODERATOR: Palmer Hough, Environmental Scientist, Wetlands Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

Mitigation Banking Process Improvements Within the USACE Fort Worth District. Brent Jasper, Project Manager / District Mitigation Banking Coordinator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Fort Worth District, Fort Worth, Tex.

Evaluating Potential Wetland Preservation Sites in Minnesota for Eligibility Under the Federal Rule. Leslie Day, Mitigation Coordinator, St. Paul District, St. Paul, Minn.

Comparing Intent of Rule to Implementation. Adam McIntyre, Principal, Water & Land Solutions, LLC, Raleigh, N.C.

SESSION 5: Conservation, Wildlife & Species Banking

MODERATOR: Craig Aubrey, Chief, Environmental Review Division, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D.C.

Nuances of Aquatic Species. Randy Wilgis, Chief Solutions Officer, Resource Environmental Solutions, Houston, Tex.

Understanding Greater Sage Grouse Crediting Opportunities & Demand in a Time of Uncertainty. Rebecca Kramer, Resilient Habitat Project Manager, Willamette Partnership,
Portland, Ore.

SESSION 6: The Farmer, Rancher & Banking

MODERATOR: Vince Messerly, Stream + Wetlands Foundation, Lancaster, Ohio

NRCS Wetland Mitigation Banking Program Current Status, Lessons Learned. Shaun T. Vickers, National Wetland Mitigation Specialist, Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDA, Lincoln, Neb.

How Mitigation Banking Became the Lifeblood of Our Farm. Drausin F. Wulsin, Manager, Red Stone Farm, LLC, Hillsboro, OH and Jacob Bartley, Owner, Plum Hill Ecological Services, LLC, Covington, Ky.

CONCURRENTS

10:15–11:30 a.m.

SESSION 7: Barrier Removal for 404 Credits: Challenges and Opportunities

MODERATOR: Jessica Wilkinson, Senior Policy Advisor, Mitigation, The Nature Conservancy, Arlington, Va.

Ruth M. Ladd, Chief, Policy and Technical Support Branch, Regulatory Division, New England District Corps of Engineers, Concord, Mass.

Adam Riggsbee, President, RiverBank Ecosystems, Austin, Tex.

Amy Singler, Director, River Restoration, American Rivers, Northampton, Mass.

SESSION 8: Banking on Bats

MODERATOR: Jane M. Ledwin, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia, Mo.

Conservation Banking for Federally Listed Bats. Shauna Marquardt, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia, Mo.

National FHWA ILF Program for the Indiana Bat. Roberta Zwier, Director, Mitigation Solutions, The Conservation Fund, Houston, Tex.

Programs in Kentucky and Pennsylvania for Bats . U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Penn.

A Bank Sponsor’s Experience with Bat Banking. Mark Tucker, National Mitigation Bank Design and Entitlement Lead, Burns & McDonnell, San Diego Calif.

SESSION 9: What Customers / Users of Mitigation Want

MODERATOR: Jennifer Johnson, Founder, Bighorn Public Affairs Group, Washington, D.C.

[Detailed descriptin coming soon]

LUNCH PLENARY

11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

Policy and Legal Update, and Implications for the Industry

CONCURRENTS

2:15–3:45 p.m.

SESSION 10: Stream Banking & Mitigation

MODERATOR: Patricia A. Grace-Jarrett, Ph.D., Senior Project Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District, Louisville, Ky.

First Stream Mitigation Bank in U.S. Based on Large-Scale Dam Removal. George Howard, Co-Founder and CEO, Restoration Systems, Raleigh, N.C.

Long-term Performance of Selected Stream Mitigation Projects in Missouri. Jane M. Ledwin, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia, Mo.

The Kentucky Stream and Wetland Umbrella Mitigation Bank. Chuck Davis, P.E., Beaver Creek Hydrology, LLC, Lexington, Ky.

SESSION 11: Emerging Markets & Approaches

MODERATOR: Eoin Doherty, Wildlife & Land Practice Lead, Senior Associate, Environmental Incentives, Lake Tahoe, Calif.

Utilizing Pay for Performance to Reduce Buyer Risk, Maximize Environmental Outcomes and Streamline Permitting. Jim Lawrence, Deputy Director, Nevada Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, Carson City, Calif.; Dustin Miller, Administrator, State of Idaho, Office of Species Conservation, Boise, ID; and Linus Paulus, Chief, Acquisition and Appraisal Section, California Department of Water Resources – Real Estate Branch, Sacramento, Calif.

SESSION 12: Infrastructure Challenges in Banking

An overview of common challenges when working with existing infrastructure (roads, gas, easements, etc.), followed by a moderated panel discussion.

MODERATOR: Marco Finocchiaro, Biologist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, Water Division, Watersheds and Wetlands Branch, Chicago, Ill.

PANELISTS

Justin Elkins, West Virginia Mitigation Program Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington, West Va.

Cory Wilson, OH Mitigation Program Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington, West Va.

Joshua Frost, Chief, Technical Services Branch, Regulatory Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville, Tenn.

Danny Bennett, Supervisor, Elkins Operations Center, West Virginia Department of Natural Resource, Elkins, West Va.

Troy Anderson, Assistant Director of Operations, Ecosystem Investment Partners, Baltimore, Md.

PLENARY

4–5:30 p.m.

Improving Ecological Restoration Success in Compensatory Mitigation: Responding to Current Challenges

MODERATOR Jeanne Christie, Executive Director, Association of State Wetland Managers, Windham, ME

David Olson, Regulatory Program Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, DC

Michael S. Rolband, President, Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc., Gainesville, VA

Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers, Windham, ME

Friday, May 11 – Day Three Conference Sessions

PLENARY

7:30–9 a.m.

Policy Roundtable Discussion with the Regulators

Join us for an early breakfast and listen to a candid conversation with the regulators from Washington, D.C.

MODERATOR Erik J. Meyers, Vice President, Climate and Water Sustainability, The Conservation Fund, Arlington, Va.

Gary Frazer, Assistant Director for Ecological Services, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D.C.

Angela Somma, Chief, Endangered Species Division, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Silver Spring, Md.

Russell Kaiser, Chief, Wetlands, & Aquatic Resources Regulatory Branch, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

Kristin Bail, Assistant Director, Office of National Conservation Lands and Community Partnerships, Bureau of Land Management, Washington, D.C. [invited]Jennifer Moyer, Chief, Regulatory Program, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C.

CONCURRENTS

9:20–10:50 a.m.

SESSION 13: Improving and Expanding Mitigation Options

MODERATOR William Ainslie, Program Manager, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 3, Atlanta, Ga.

An Alternative Process to Modify Umbrella Banking/in-lieu Fee Instruments for Addition of Mitigation Sites. Patricia Grace-Jarrett, Ph.D., Senior Project Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville, Ky.

Tribally Sponsored Mitigation Banks and ILF Programs. Suzanne L. Anderson, PhD, PWS, Mitigation Program Coordinator, Seattle District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle, Wash.

Fee Schedule, Crediting, and Project Solicitation for In-lieu Fee Program for Endangered Atlantic Salmon Impacts. Ruth M. Ladd, Chief, Policy and Technical Support Branch, Regulatory Division, New England District Corps of Engineers, Concord, Mass.

SESSION 14: Emerging Trends & Opportunities

MODERATOR: George W. Kelly, Chief Markets Officer, Resource Environmental Solutions, LLC, Owings Mill, Md.

Adaptation for Restoration: New and Evolving Business Models and Markets for the Future of the Restoration Industry. Todd BenDor, Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N.C.

Natural Resource Damages, Mitigation Banking, and the Watershed Approach. Jim McElfish, Senior Attorney, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C.

Connecting Ecological Indicators & Ecosystem Services to Infrastructure Planning in Great Houston. Deborah January-Bevers, President, Houston Wilderness, Houston, Tex. (Co-authors: Lauren Harper, Environmental Policy Specialist and Lindsey Roche, Ecosystem Services Coordinator, Houston Wilderness, Houston, Tex.)

SESSION 15: Stream Tools

MODERATOR Richard K. Mogensen, President, Mogensen Mitigation, and Adjunct Professor, UNCC, Charlotte, N.C.

An Evaluation of the Technical Aspects of Substrate Related Monitoring Requirements for Stream Mitigation. Robert Siegfried, Senior Project Manager, Resource Environmental Solutions, Richmond, Va.

Restoration of Stream-Wetland Complexes. Arthur C. Parola, Ph.D., PE, Director, University of Louisville Stream Institute, Louisville, Ky.

Comparison and Use of Aerial and Terrestrial LiDAR for Stream Restoration. Joshua White, Geomorphologist, Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc., Worthington, OH

CONCURRENTS

11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

SESSION 16: Performance Standards

MODERATOR Pamela Fetterman, Principal Scientist
ecoGENESIS, LLC, Sarasota Fla.

Comparing Floristic Quality Scores in Mitigation Banks to the National Wetland Condition Assessment. Kathleen M. Bowers, ORISE Research Participant, Environmental Protection Agency, Arlington, Va.

Evaluating Aquatic Resource Mitigation Projects in the 21st Century. David Olson, Regulatory Program Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C.

Developing Performance Standards and Credit Release Schedules in Minnesota. Leslie Day, Mitigation Coordinator, St. Paul District, St. Paul, Minn.

SESSION 17: Banking on Public Lands

MODERATOR Catherine (Tommie) Herbert, National Conservation Finance Lead, U.S. Forest Service, Washington, D.C.

The Use of Public and Private Partnerships to Facilitate Large-scale Mitigation Programs. Michelle Lee Mattson, Restoration Ecologist/Compensatory Mitigation Specialist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va. and Lindsay Teunis, Senior Ecologist and Project Manager, ICF

Interested in Sponsoring Compensatory Mitigation on Public Lands. Deblyn Mead, National Mitigation Coordinator, Bureau of Land Management, Washington, D.C. and Gray Stevens, Managing Partner, Sandy Creek Partners, LLC, North Port, Fla.

SESSION 18: Working with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Districts on Third-Party Mitigation
[Detailed description coming soon]

OUTDOOR CLASSROOMS

12:30–4:30 p.m.

Outdoor Classroom #2: Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest

Hosted by Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest
(45 minute drive each way); Early Fee (by 1/25/18): $75

The 15,625 acre Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest comprises the largest privately-owned conservation and education property in Kentucky. Our diverse landscapes provide for a multitude of plants and animals, existing across habitats of mature forest, prairies, glades, caves, and streams. The Imperiled Bat Conservation Fund has helped Bernheim acquire tracts (over 1000 acres total) to help buffer their Foundation-owned forest, and has both Indiana bat and NLEB maternity colonies, and have installed Branden bark roost structures in a couple locations that are being used. Participants will also see a stream mitigation site. With a mission of connecting people with nature, and a focus on managing for biodiversity and resiliency in the landscape, Bernheim plays a unique role as a conservation leader in the Louisville region. [also available Tuesday, May 8, 8 a.m.–12 p.m.]
Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest

GOLD

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
EPA
EPA
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Forest Service
Bureau of Land Management
NRCS
NOAA Fisheries
U.S. Department of Transportation

SILVER

BLUE

GREEN