Agenda

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Tuesday, May 9   Pre-Conference Activities

8:30 a.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Field Trip #1 River Ranch

Hosted by Wildlands (30 Minute Drive)   Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $58

This is a unique opportunity to visit a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 404 wetland mitigation bank, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service species conservation bank, a National Marine Fisheries Service approved salmon conservation bank, and California Department of Fish and Wildlife approved farm-friendly raptor preserves at the Wildlands River Ranch Mitigation Complex. The River Ranch is located approximately 30 minutes from downtown Sacramento and will give visitors a comprehensive look at mitigation and conservation banking in Northern California. The tour will include three separate site visits; first of the wetland mitigation bank, then on to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration salmon bank and USFWS conservation bank at the northern portion of the Ranch.  Wildlands staff will be stationed at each bank to answer questions and provide insight into banking on the ground in the Sacramento Valley. Onsite transportation via hay ride. BBQ lunch included.

Field Trip #2 Westervelt Bullock Bend and the Nigiri Project at Knaggs Ranch

Hosted by NOAA, Westervelt and Caltrout/UC Davis (40 Minute Drive)   Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $58

At Knaggs Ranch, CalTrout, working closely with UC Davis, Cal Marsh and Farm Ventures LLC, and Knaggs Ranch LLC, is helping spearhead the Nigiri project, a collaborative research effort between farmers and researchers to help restore salmon populations by reintroducing them during winter to inundated floodplains that are farmed with rice during the summer.  The concepts being studied here are being applied to the development of the Central Valley Habitat Exchange (CVHE).  The CVHE is an emerging market-based conservation mechanism for restoring and protecting wildlife habitat in the Central Valley and for mitigating impacts to wildlife habitat from development and infrastructure projects. This is a good opportunity to learn about and emerging and innovative market-based mitigation approach to floodplain agriculture-friendly floodplain management. Bullock Bend Bank is approved and Westervelt Ecological Services is about to build a new floodplain mitigation bank along the Sacramento River called Bullock Bend where there has been a 98% loss of historic floodplain habitat. The bank addresses one of NMFS highest priority action items in our Central Valley salmon and steelhead restoration plan.  The bank is also about 25-30 miles away from Sacramento.

Field Trip #3 Elsie Gridley Conservation and Mitigation Bank

Hosted by WRA (45 Minute Drive)   Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $58

Elsie Gridley Conservation and Mitigation Bank is the second largest bank in California at 1,837 acres. Gridley Bank was first approved in 2006 by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Army Corps of Engineers, and the Environmental Protection Agency, with additional phases approved in 2016. Gridley bank offers a variety of species credit types including 3 vernal pool crustacean species, 7 plant species, California tiger salamander, burrowing owl, Swainson’s hawk and multiple wetland credit types. Gridley bank is ideally situated amongst a variety of large protected tracts of habitat that add to it’s conservation value. May is an ideal time to visit vernal pool wetlands and grasslands, with the possibility for abundant flowers and water still in the pools. We are likely to see a variety of grassland songbirds, wading birds, raptors, and waterfowl as well as wetland invertebrates. Time permitting we may visit the adjacent 1,500 acre Jepson Prairie Vernal Pool Preserve which is part of the UC Davis Reserve System and home to 400 species and 64 families of plants, including 15 rare and endangered plants.

Field Trip #4 SMUD Nature Preserve Mitigation Bank

Hosted by Sacramento Municipal Utility District (50 Minute Drive)   Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $58

The SMUD Nature Preserve Mitigation Bank consists of 1,132 acres of annual grassland and vernal pool habitat, located in southeastern Sacramento County.  The Bank is a multi-species/multi-habitat mitigation bank that provides for the long-term projection of special-status species and habitats, including Sacramento Orcutt grass, vernal pool fairy shrimp, vernal pool tadpole shrimp, California tiger salamander, western spadefoot, tricolored blackbirds and burrowing owls.

8 a.m. — 12:30 p.m.

Basics of Banking 101 Workshop

Includes access to online audio and materials. Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $145

FACILITATORS:  Robert W. Brumbaugh, Deputy Director, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.; Greg Sutter, President and Hall Holland, Senior Conservation Planner, Westervelt Ecological Services, Sacramento, Calif.; and Craig Denisoff, President, Craig Denisoff Consulting, Davis, Calif.

Ideal for those new to or exploring an interest in mitigation or conservation banking.

How-to’s of both Mitigation and Conservation Banking are presented in this half-day workshop. Starting with the history of banking, this workshop addresses site selection and technical aspects, monitoring and the business of banking (legal, financial, marketing) including walking participant through a banking agreement.

12:40 – 2:15 p.m.

Regulatory In lieu fee & Bank Information Tracking System Workshop

Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $55  Box lunch Inlcuded

FACILITATORS:  Beattie Starr Williams, Director, Computer Sciences & Consulting Services, Applied Research Associates, Vicksburg, Miss.; Shannon Langford, Senior Software Engineer, Applied Research Associates, Inc., Huntsville, Ala.; and Steve Martin, Environmental Scientist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.

A web-based application developed by the Corps with support from EPA and US FWS, Regulatory In lieu fee & Bank Information Tracking System (RIBITS) is being utilized by the Corps and FWS to provide information on mitigation and conservation banking activities. RIBITS provides a range of information on mitigation and conservation banking including bank locations, service areas, credit type and availability, ledgers, and supporting documentation.

The first part of the workshop includes navigation in RIBITS including entering and editing data in RIBITS, entering credit transactions in bank ledgers, loading documents and images, creation of bank limits and service areas, and editing bank data.

The second part focuses on data mining — user-generated queries data, export of data, and geographic searches. It focuses on entering and editing data in RIBITS, including entering credit transactions in bank ledgers, loading documents and images, creation of bank limits and service areas, and editing bank data.

12:45 – 4:20 p.m.

In Lieu of Fee Workshop

Includes access to online audio and materials. Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $100

FACILITATORS:  Rebecca Kihslinger, Science and Policy Analyst, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. , Jessica Wilkinson, Senior Policy Advisor-Mitigation and Sara Mascola, Program Advisor, Development by Design, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, D.C.

Nationwide, In-Lieu Fee (ILF) mitigation programs provide aquatic resource offsets for a significant percentage of the required compensatory mitigation in the U.S. (around 7 percent annually). This workshop will provide current or potential ILF program sponsors a forum to discuss a range of issues identified by the workshop facilitators including, for example, the project approval process, the watershed approach, and long-term financing. The purpose of the workshop is to enhance knowledge transfer and support sharing of best practices across the field of ILF mitigation practitioners, thereby supporting the delivery of ILF programs that support high and consistent standards for compensatory mitigation. ESA ILF program sponsors interested in learning more about the mechanisms/challenges under the CWA 404 program, as well as network, may also wish to attend.

1 – 5 p.m.

Bank Tank® Meetings (must apply online)

2:15 – 4:15 p.m.

Advanced Stream Banking Workshop

Includes online access to audio and materials. Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $85

FACILITATORS:   Steve Jones, President, Meanders River Restoration, Ellijay, Ga., Adam Riggsbee, President, RiverBank Ecosystems, Austin, Tex. and Todd Tugwell, Special Projects Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Wake Forest, N.C.

An advanced course on stream banking and restoration practices involved facilitated by banker and stream restoration experts with a local regulatory perspective, this course provides current and new information in stream banking including practices, experiences and regulatory changes affecting stream banking today.

2:15 – 4:15 p.m.

Advanced Conservation Banking Workshop

Includes online access to materials; not recorded. Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $85

FACILITATORS:   Valerie Layne, Senior Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Sacramento, Calif. and Charlotte Kucera, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Austin, Tex.

An advanced course on conservation banking, this is an ideal workshop for those who have been introduced to conservation banking and are interested in learning more. Workshop addresses the banking market and ESA, the bank approval process, service areas, and crediting and debiting methodologies.

4:30 – 5:45 p.m.

For the Regulator—Business of Banking Workshop

$50 (Included with Government registration)

Designed for regulators but available to all

FACILITATOR: Gray Stevens, Managing Partner, Sandy Creek Partners, LLC, North Port, Fla.

Utilizing hypothetical case studies, the workshop is interactive and emphasizes audience participation. Includes concepts such as cost of capital, supply / demand based pricing, risk adjusted rates of return, risk / reward profiles for specific banking projects and the role of equivalency. Also identifies key risk factors in the permitting process and their potential impact on bank returns while exploring ways public and private sectors can partner to attract more private capital for wetland and conservation restoration projects.

Wednesday, May 10

8:30 – 10 a.m.

Regulators Forum (for Regulators on IRTs)

FACILITATORS:  Palmer Hough, Environmental Scientist, Wetlands Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.; Valerie Layne, Senior Biologist, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Sacramento, Calif.; Susan-Marie Stedman, Wetland Scientist and Policy Analyst, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Silver Spring, Md.; Steve Martin, Environmental Scientist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.; Christy Johnson-Hughes, ESA Compensatory Mitigation Lead, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Falls Church, Va.

For Regulators on IRT – This forum is a venue for federal and state regulators involved in regulating mitigation and conservation banking (those on IRTs) to discuss joint issues and concerns.

8:30 – 10 a.m.

User/Buyer Forum

FACILITATORS:   Mike Ruth, Ecologist/Registered Professional Geologist, Project Development & Environmental Review, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C.; Owen McDonough, Environmental Policy Manager, National Association of Home Builders, Washington, D.C.; and Corrie Veenstra, Environmental Planner, Project Management Section, Environmental Security Section, U.S. Marine Corps, Camp Pendleton, Calif.

An open exchange of ideas, current hot topics, questions and concerns with those involved in the use of mitigation and conservation banks and other ecosystem programs throughout the United States.

8:30 – 10 a.m.

Ecological Restoration Business Association (ERBA) Meeting

ERBA members and prospective members are invited to a meeting on the association’s 2017 priorities, anti-trust policy, the principles of successful associations, ERBA’s membership structure, and a report from Washington. Please note that Ecological Restoration Business Association is the new trade name for the National Mitigation Banking Association. The importance of this new trade name for the NMBA advocacy efforts will also be discussed during the meeting.

10:20 – 11:20 a.m.

First Look, Fast Take Group Discussions

Thoughtful and fast paced robust discussions look into relevant issues. Groups are facilitator-led with experts ready to engage in discussion with each other and attendees.  Must choose one when registering.

Group #1   Site Selection Considerations for Mitigation Sites in California

Expert Lineup: Krystel Bell, Mitigation Banking Specialist, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento, Calif. and Valerie Layne, Senior Biologist, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Sacramento, Calif.; Howard Brown, Chief, Sacramento River Basin Area, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Sacramento, Calif.; Leana Rosetti, Environmental Scientist, Wetlands Office, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 9, San Francisco, Calif.; and Janice Gan, Senior Environmental Scientist Specialist, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Bay Delta Region 3, Napa, Calif.


Group #2   California’s AB 2087 Law – A First Look before Thursday’s Session     

Expert Lineup: Jennifer Garrison, Senior Environmental Scientist, Habitat Conservation Planning Branch, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Sacramento Calif.; Travis Hemmen, Vice President, Business and Marketing Developer, Westervelt Ecological Services, Sacramento, Calif.; Liz O’Donoghue Director, Infrastructure and Land Use, The Nature Conservancy, San Francisco, Calif.


Group #3 Nationwide Permits

Expert Lineup: (Lead) Dave Olson, Regulatory Program Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C.; George W. Kelly, Chief Markets Officer, Resource Environmental Solutions, LLC, Owings Mill, Md.; and Owen McDonough, Environmental Policy Manager, National Association of Home Builders, Washington, D.C.


Group #4   Mitigation Policy for Coastal Areas – What’s Different, What’s the Same?

Expert Lineup: Susan-Marie Stedman, Wetland Scientist and Policy Analyst, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Silver Spring, Md.

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Lunch Box Workshops

60 minute sponsored workshops – Must Register in Advance; Limited Capacity

Workshop #1 MCDA, Risk and Design Optimization for Stream Mitigation and Restoration
FACILITATOR:  David Bidelspach, Engineer, 5 Smooth Stones Restoration, PLLC, Livermore, Colo. and Lee Forbes, Senior Ecosystem Restoration Engineer, SWCA Environmental Consultants, Houston, Tex.

Workshop #2 Using Sustainability as a Tool for Innovation in Stream Restoration
FACILITATOR:  Scott McGill, Principal and Founder, Ecotone, Inc., Forest Hills, Md.

Workshop #3 The Watershed Resources Registry
FACILITATORS:  Sandy Hertz, Assistant Director, Office of Environment, Maryland Department of Transportation Headquarters, Hanover, Md. and Kelly Neff, Chief, Mitigation and Technical Assistance Section, Maryland Department of the Environment, Baltimore, Md.

1 – 2 p.m.

OPENING SESSION

MODERATOR:  Donald Ross, Immediate Past President, Ecological Restoration Business Association

Conference Welcome
Carlene T. Bahler, President, JT&A, inc.

Welcome to Sacramento
Michael Jewell, Chief, Regulatory Program, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento, Calif.

Special Address
The Honorable John Laird, Secretary, California Natural Resources Agency, Sacramento, Calif.

Special address from the new Administration
[TBD]

2:15 – 3:45 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions: Sales & Marketing | Exchanges & Methodologies | Stream Assessment

Session 1: Sales & Marketing Approaches
Three established firms in the mitigation and conservation banking industry share their approaches to sales & marketing, including examples of successes.

Sheri Lewin, President, Environmental Resource Marketing, Clermont, Fla
Travis Hemmen, Vice President, Business and Market Developer, Westervelt Ecological Services, Sacramento, Calif.
Troy Madrigal, Vice President and Principal, Mitigation Solutions USA, Houston, Tex.

Session 2: Exchanges & Methodologies
MODERATOR: Wayne White, Associate, Mitigation Solutions USA, Citrus Heights, Calif.

Utah Prairie Dog Habitat Credit Exchange, Market-based Species Recovery Banking Mechanism
Erica Wightman, MS(NR), Credit Exchange Manager, Panoramaland Resource Conservation and Development, Spring City, Utah

Alaska District Credit Debit Methodology
Sheila Newman, Chief, Special Actions and Calvin Alvarez, Project Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Anchorage, Alaska

Measuring Mitigation Credits, Debits and Ratios Across the United States
Joseph A. Morgan M.S., Life Scientist, Water Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9 San Francisco, Calif.

Session 3: Innovation in Stream Assessment and Mitigation Protocols
MODERATOR: Will Harman, PG, Principal, Stream Mechanics, Raleigh, N.C.

Will McDow, Director, Habitat Markets, Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, D.C.
Julie McCarthy, Environmental Scientist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8, Denver, Colo.
Vena Jones, Environmental Consultant, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Nashville, Tenn.

4 – 5:30 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions: Long-Term Stewardship Funding, Then & Now | Emerging Markets | Science, Technology & Tools

Session 4: Long-Term Stewardship Funding, Then & Now
MODERATOR:  Timothy J. DiCintio, J.D., Senior Vice President, Impact-Directed Environmental Accounts, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Washington, D.C.

Steve Martin, Environmental Scientist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.
Greg DeYoung, Vice President, Westervelt Ecological Services, Sacramento, Calif.
Erin Okuno, Foreman Biodiversity Fellow, Stetson University College of Law, Gulfport, Fla.
Palmer Hough, Environmental Scientist, Wetlands Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

Session 5: Emerging Markets
MODERATOR: George W. Kelly, Chief Markets Officer, Resource Environmental Solutions, LLC, Owings Mill, Md.

Voluntary Prelist Mitigation Programs Creating Opportunities for Private Capital and Working Lands
Eoin Doherty, Senior Associate, Environmental Incentives, South Lake Tahoe, Calif.

Innovations in Carbon Finance.
Jane Rice, Conservation Finance Manager, WRA, Denver, Colo.

Infrastructure Initiatives – Opportunities for Mitigation and Offsets
Mike Ruth, Ecologist and Professional Geologist, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C.

Session 6: Science, Technology & Tools
MODERATOR:   Bryan Matsumoto, Senior Regulatory Project Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco, Calif.

Using USACE Cost Engineering Process to Evaluate Cost Estimates for Mitigation Sites
Amy Thompson, Biologist/Project Manager, Mitigation Bank Team and Joseph Joson, Civil Engineer, Cost Engineering Section, Engineering Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, Fla.

The Use of HEA to Determine Mitigation Needs: A Case Study of Idaho Phosphate Mine Impacts
Jill McGrady, Ph.D., Associate Ecologist, Great Ecology, San Diego, Calif.

Designs that Drive the Success of Stream Mitigation Banks
Nathan Ober, Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc, Bridgeport, West Va.

5:30 – 7 p.m.

Welcome Reception, Exhibit Area
Co-Hosted by NMBA and JT&A, inc.

Thursday, May 11

8 – 9:30 a.m.

PLENARY: Mitigation on Public Lands

This panel will address new policies on mitigation on public lands

MODERATOR:  Chris Hartley, Ph.D., Deputy Director and Senior Environmental Markets Analyst, Office of Environmental Markets, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.

Deborah (Deblyn) Mead, National Mitigation Coordinator, Bureau of Land Management, Washington, D.C.
Craig Aubrey, Chief, Division of Environmental Review, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Falls, Church, Va.
Sheila Newman, Chief, Special Actions, Regulatory Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Anchorage, Alaska
Doug Lashley, Managing Member, Greenvest, LLC, Millersville, Md.

10 – 11:30 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions: Banking Status and Trends | NRDA Policy & Practice

Session 7: Banking Status and Trends
MODERATOR: Palmer Hough, Environmental Scientist, Wetlands Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

Characterization of National and Regional Third Party Mitigation Activity 2008-2016
Steve Martin, Environmental Scientist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.

Species Conservation Banking in the U.S.: Where we are after 20+ years of practice?
Will McDow, Director, Habitat Markets, Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, D.C.

Natural Resources Conservation Service’s Wetland Mitigation Banking Program
Jennifer Cavanaugh, Environmental/Wetland Compliance Coordinator, California State Office, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Davis, Calif.

Session 8: NRDA Policy, Practice & Opportunities
MODERATOR: Dr. Mark S. Laska, President & CEO, Great Ecology, San Diego, Calif.

Megan Callahan Grant, Restoration Program Coordinator, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Restoration Center, Portland, Ore.
Julie Mentzer, Director of Environmental Operations, Wildlands PNW, Portland, Ore.
Peter Dykstra, Partner, Plauché & Carr, LLP, Seattle, Wash.

11:30 – 1:45 p.m.

Lunch Plenary

MODERATOR: George Kelly, Chief Markets Officer, Resource Environmental Solutions, Owings Mill, Md.

“Top 10″ of NMEBC and Presentation of the Judith Taggart Founder’s Scholarship Award
Craig Denisoff, President, Craig Denisoff Consulting and Robert Brumbaugh, Deputy Director of Institute of Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.

A Washington Perspective – Then, Now & Tomorrow
Douglas P. Wheeler, Partner, Hogan Lovells US LLP, Washington, D.C.

What’s up with WOTUS (and other mitigation litigation)?
Royal C. Gardner, Professor of Law and Director, Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy,
Stetson University College of Law, Gulfport, Fla.

2 – 3:30 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions: Conservation Banking | Stream Banking in California

Session 9: Conservation Banking
MODERATOR:  Jennifer Norris, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento, Calif.

Muddy Boggy Conservation Bank: Lesson’s Learned Managing Habitat for an Endangered Species
Terry McKenzie, President and Founding Principal, Mitigation Solutions USA, Houston, Tex.

Banking on Floodplains for Salmon Recovery
Howard Brown, Chief, Sacramento River Basin Branch, California Central Valley Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Sacramento, Calif.

Results from a Survey of Conservation Banking Sponsors and Managers
Sarah Cline, Economist, Office of Policy Analysis, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C.

Session 10: Stream Banking in California
MODERATOR: George Howard, Co-Founder & CEO, Restoration Systems, LLC, Raleigh, N.C.

National and California-specific data on stream banking is presented, followed by panel discussion of presentations.

The State of CWA 404 Stream Mitigation Across the Country’s USACE Districts.
Lee W. Forbes P.E., D.WRE, Senior Ecosystem Restoration Engineer, SWCA Environmental Consultants, Houston, Tex.

Market Summary for Stream-derived Bundled Credits in California.
Mark Kalnins, Associate Regulatory Permitting Specialist, WRA, Inc., San Rafael, Calif.

PANELISTS
Krystel Bell, Mitigation Banking Specialist, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento, Calif.
Melissa Scianni, Biologist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9, Los Angeles, Calif.
Stephanie Buss, Senior Environmental Scientist, Mitigation Banking Program, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Rancho Cordova, Calif.
Elizabeth “Liz” Morrison, Senior Environmental Scientist, San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, Oakland, Calif.

4 – 5:30 p.m.

PLENARY: ESA Policy

MODERATOR: Susan-Marie Stedman, Wetland Scientist and Policy Analyst, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Silver Spring, Md.

Randy Wilgis, Chief Solutions Officer, Resource Environmental Solutions, Houston, Tex.
Craig Aubrey, Chief, Division of Environmental Review Division, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Falls Church, Va.
Brooke Wahlberg, Partner, Nossaman, LLP, Austin, Tex.

Friday, May 12

7:30 – 9 a.m.

Breakfast Policy Roundtable

MODERATOR: Erik J. Meyers, Vice President, Climate and Water Sustainablility, The Conservation Fund, Arlington, Va.

Federal leaders and private industry share insights and updates on policies.

Angela Somma, Chief, Endangered Species Division, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Silver Spring, Md.
Mindy Eisenberg, Associate Director, Wetlands Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.
Craig Aubrey, Chief, Division of Environmental Review, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Falls Church, Va.
Jennifer Moyer, Chief, Regulatory Program, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C.
Karen Kelleher, Acting Assistant Director, Resources and Planning, Bureau of Land Management, Washington, D.C.
Randy Vogel, President, Ecological Restoration Business Association, Rosemont, Ill.

9:20 – 10:50 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions: Applications of Remote Sensing | California Perspectives | Landscape Approach

Session 11: Applications of Remote Sensing
MODERATOR:  David John, CEO, The Wetlandsbank Company, LLC, Plantation, Fla.

Using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for Invasive Species Management on NRCS WRE Projects in FL
Jon Morton, Biologist, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, West Palm Beach, Fla.

Integrative Approaches to Restoration Performance Monitoring
Peter Kobylarz, GISP, GIS Coordinator, WRA Inc., San Rafael, Calif.

Using Ultra High Resolution Aerial Remote Sensing for Wetland Restoration Monitoring
Christian Newman, President, APEM Inc., Gainesville, Fla. Co-Authors: David Campbell, Principal Remote Sensing Scientist, APEM Ltd; Joe Sicbaldi, Manager Everglades Mitigation Bank, Florida Power and Light; and Julia Robinson Willmott, Senior Scientist, Normandeau Associates, Inc.; Dr. Stuart Clough, Director, APEM Ltd.

Session 12: California Perspectives
MODERATOR: Ronald Unger, Landscape Conservation Planning Program Manager, California Department of Wildlife and Fish, Sacramento, Calif.

Challenges to Implementing Mitigation on Publicly Owned Lands in Southern California
Michelle Mattson, Restoration Ecologist/Compensatory Mitigation Specialist, Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Va.

California’s Regional Conservation Investment Strategy – A New Tool for Conservation and Mitigation
Liz O’Donoghue Director, Infrastructure and Land Use, The Nature Conservancy, San Francisco, Calif.

California High Speed Rail Mitigation
Mark McLoughlin, Director of Environmental Services, California High Speed Rail Authority, Sacramento, Calif.

Advance Mitigation for Transportation Projects in California
William Kirkham, Senior Environmental Planner, Advance Mitigation Program, California Department of Transportation (CalTrans), Sacramento, Calif.

Session 13: Landscape Approaches
MODERATOR:  Roberta Zwier, Director, Mitigation Solutions, The Conservation Fund, Cypress, Tex.

Continental Divide-Creston (CD-C) EIS and Landscape Scale Mitigation Strategy
Jennifer Fleuret-McConchie, Planning and Environmental Coordinator, Bureau of Land Management, Cheyenne, Wyo.

Diversity by Design – A Multi-Species Approach to Mitigation and Ecosystem Protection
Pamela Zevit, Registered Professional Biologist, Adamah Consultants/South Coast Conservation Program, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada

Implementing Restoration Projects on Public Lands
Nicole Hayes, Project Coordinator, Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, Alaska

Channel Migration Easement Program: An Innovative Approach to Protecting Riparian Habitat
Wendy Weaver, Executive Director, Montana Aquatic Resources Services, Bozeman, Mont.

11 a.m. –12:30 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions: In Lieu Fee, Mitigation Options | Banking in Urban and Suburban Settings | Landowners and Environmental Markets — Understanding the Opportunities

Session 14: In Lieu Fee, Mitigation Options
MODERATOR:  Jessica Wilkinson, Senior Policy Advisor, Mitigation, The Nature Conservancy, Arlington Va.

Use of an ILF Program for Impacts to Habitat for the Endangered Atlantic Salmon
Ruth Ladd, P.W.S., Chief, Policy & Technical Support Branch, New England District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Concord, Mass. and Joseph Hankins, Vice President, The Conservation Fund, Shepherdstown, West Va.

The Role of In Lieu Fee Programs Under the 2008 Mitigation Rule
Kurt Stephenson, Professor, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va.

Clean Water Act ILF Programs with Habitat Conservation Plans in Northern California
Krystel Bell, Mitigation Banking Specialist, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento, Calif.

Session 15: Banking in Urban and Suburban Settings
MODERATOR:  Dave Urban, Director of Operations, Ecosystem Investment Partners, Baltimore, Md.

Wetland and Stream Compensatory Mitigation in Urban Landscapes
David Olson, Regulatory Program Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C.

Urban Mitigation – Keeping Banks and ILF Sites Local
Suzanne Anderson, Ph.D., PWS, Mitigation Program, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, Seattle, Wash.

Brownfields and Mitigation Banks
Beverly F. Birkitt, Business Owner/Senior Environmental Consultant, Birkitt Environmental Services, Inc., Tampa, Fla. and Frank Hearne, IV, Esq., Stakeholder, Mechanic Nuccio Hearne & Wester, Tampa, Fla

Session 16: Landowners and Environmental Markets — Understanding the Opportunities
MODERATOR: Tim DeGraff, CEO, WRA, San Rafael, Calif.

A moderated panel discussion designed for landowners interested in exploring options available to them – also of benefit to bankers. Doing your own bank, partnering with investors or bankers, and other considerations for the landowner. An outline presentation highlighting the different approaches and considerations (pros & cons) will be provided followed by a moderated discussion on their benefits and challenges.

Jeff Kauttu, Principal Appraiser, Kauttu Valuation, St. Augustine, Fla.
G. Braiden Chadwick, J.D., Partner, Mitchell Chadwick LLP, Roseville, Calif.
Valerie Layne, Senior Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento, Calif.
George Kelly, Chief Markets Officer, Resource Environmental Solutions, Owings Mill, Md.

11:30 a.m.– 4:30 p.m.

POST-CONFERENCE ACTIVITIES

Field Trip #5 Muzzy Ranch Conservation Bank

Hosted by Muzzy Ranch (50 Minute Drive)   Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $58

Muzzy Ranch Conservation Banking is located in the center of Solano County, California on 734 acres of prime habitat. The conservation bank preserves critical vernal pools, playa ponds and upland habitat for numerous species. Muzzy Ranch Conservation Bank has preserved the following species: Vernal Pool Tadpole Shrimp and Vernal Pool Fairy Shrimp – 203.3 Credits CTS Breeding and Conservancy Fairy Shrimp – 35.4 Credits San Joaquin Valley Orcutt Grass – 1.15 Credits Delta Green Ground Beetle – Credit based on project impact CTS Upland and Movement – 494.30 Credits Preservation is also available for the following CEQA special status plant species: Baker’s navarretia, Alkali milkvetch, Dwarf downingia

Field Trip #6 Cosumnes Floodplain Mitigation Bank & Nicolaus Ranch Conservation Bank

Hosted by Westervelt Ecological Services (40 minute drive)   Early Fee (by 1/25/17): $58

This tour explores a salmon and wetlands mitigation bank on the Cosumnes Floodplain Mitigation Bank and Nicolaus Ranch Conservation Bank – a valley elderberry longhorn beetle bank, located along the last undamed river in California, the Cosumnes River. Established in 2009, the 495-acre Cosumnes was one of the first wetland banks approved under the 2008 federal Wetlands Compensatory Mitigation Rule. We will see how this former vineyard was restored to a tidally influenced floodplain that provides mitigation for riparian, perennial, and seasonal wetland habitats and benefits native salmonids. Cosumnes is approved by the National Marine Fisheries Service, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers. From there, we will travel to Nicolaus Ranch Conservation Bank where a recently restored riparian habitat focuses on the recovery and protection of the endangered valley elderberry longhorn beetle (VELB). The VELB is completely dependent on its host plant, elderberry, which occurs in riparian and other woodland and scrub communities. Approved in 2016 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the project is an example of preserved and permanently protected VELB habitat that expands the riparian community in this area.

SILVER

GREEN